Tag: Review/Recap

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Review: Dark and Deepest Red by Anna-Marie McLemore

Reviewed by Vanessa Rodriguez Dark and Deepest Red is a young adult magical realism novel by Latinx LGBTQ+ author, Anne-Marie McLemore. This reimagining of Hans Christian Andersen’s “The Red Shoes” is written in multiple POVs, including a young woman in sixteenth century Strasbourg, France, and draws on several accounts in history of a dancing plague...

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Review: Hexis by Charlene Elsby

by Laura Diaz de Arce Reading Hexis is very much like being spun around in a playground carousel. It’s dizzying, but you are emboldened by the wild feeling of it. It may be a bit nauseating, but you’ll ask to do it again. And in the middle of all this, your perception and sense of...

Review: Follow Me to Ground by Sue Rainsford
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Review: Follow Me to Ground by Sue Rainsford

Reviewed by Ivonne Spinoza This is an unusual book.  It’s unsettling, it’s dark, it’s sometimes even gory, but it’s definitely not your average garden variety horror. I’m not even sure if I’d classify it as horror despite the dark themes and the tone. It has horror aspects, but that doesn’t come close to doing it...

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Review: Crier’s War by Nina Varela

by Laila Winters Of all the books that were released in 2019, I was most excited for Nina Varela’s debut. Crier’s War is an LGBTQ+ novel that straddles the line between science fiction and fantasy, and it did not disappoint. It tells the story of Ayla, a human servant with the dire need to avenge...

Review: House of Salt and Sorrows
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Review: House of Salt and Sorrows

House of Salt and Sorrow is billed as a retelling of ’12 Dancing Princesses’, a Grimm fairy tale. Since I was unfamiliar with the original, which itself is a variation of fairy tales passed on to the Grimm brothers, I did not research the origin until after I finished the book.  House of Salt and Sorrow may...

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Waubgeshig Rice talks about Moon of the Crusted Snow and Crossing Ethnic Lines in Reviews

By Chris La Tray I became aware of the work of Waubgeshig Rice, an Anishinaabe writer and journalist from Wasauksing First Nation in Canada, in January of 2019. His second novel, Moon of the Crusted Snow, was released in October of 2018 and had just popped up as an “advanced listening” audio book for free...