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Friday’s Forgotten Books: MISSING IN PRECINCT PUERTO RICO BY STEVEN TORRES

Steven Torres uses his skills as a storyteller to use the threads of an investigation to build tension in Missing in Precinct Puerto Rico. From the start, puzzle pieces are introduced that are used to filter all the additional details that arise during the course of the investigation. Torres does an excellent job of developing...

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10 #OwnVoices, Asian-inspired Fantasy YA Books of 2019

by Margaret Kingsbury This year brings a lot of amazing Asian #OwnVoices YA fantasy. While Asian characters and settings have been a part of fantasy for a long time, often these settings and cultural practices have been appropriated by white authors, and stereotypes abound. That’s one reason why it’s so important for more #OwnVoices Asian...

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#BrownExcellence – Trapline by Snotty Nose Rez Kids

“Trapline” is an audio proclamation of Indigenous revolutionary teachings. It’s about being proud while jamming out and telling the world we’re reclaiming everything we are. Snotty Nosed Rez Kids’ (SNRK) third album opens with a skit “Wa’wais”: an in-depth cultural explanation and teaching about respect and connection to the land. It gives listeners just a...

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Flashback Reviews: Indian Horse by Richard Wagamese and There There by Tommy Orange

by Brian Lindenmuth My round-up of top reads of 2018 was published at Toe Six Press originally. Two – my Book of the Year and one of my top reads – were by Indigenous Authors. For Canada’s National Indigenous People’s Day I wanted to share these quick takes here. Book of the year: Indian Horse by...

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Waubgeshig Rice talks about Moon of the Crusted Snow and Crossing Ethnic Lines in Reviews

By Chris La Tray I became aware of the work of Waubgeshig Rice, an Anishinaabe writer and journalist from Wasauksing First Nation in Canada, in January of 2019. His second novel, Moon of the Crusted Snow, was released in October of 2018 and had just popped up as an “advanced listening” audio book for free...

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The Poetry of Us: Hughes, Dunbar, DuBois and Peele

by Brian Lindenmuth “This movie is about duality and this idea that for however we define the word ‘us,’ for there to be an ‘us’ there has to be a ‘them,’” said Peele. “It can be your class, your country, your family. The way we think about ‘them’ informs the way we think about ‘us.’”...