Author: Bronzeville Bee (Bronzeville Bee)

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Women in Horror Month
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Women in Horror Month

By Mary SanGiovanni As you may or may not be aware, February in the publishing business – or, at least, in the horror genre – is considered Women in Horror Month.  Traditionally, during this month, writers, editors, readers, reviewers, fans, etc. of both sexes and all genders try to raise awareness of the work of...

The Horrific Origins of Fairy Tales
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The Horrific Origins of Fairy Tales

By Margaret Kingsbury “All that is left is to make him delicious,” says the delightfully creepy witch at the end of the movie trailer for Gretel & Hansel, a horror retelling of the classic tale. No talking animals, no pastel prettiness, no Disney whimsy. This is a film that’s pulling from the grotesque origins of...

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#DignidadLiteraria

by Hector Acosta By now you’re all probably acquainted with the American Dirt debacle. In case you’re not, let me direct you to Myriam Gurba’s fantastic review of the book, which breaks down how the novel and its author, Jeanine Cummins, failed its readers with its portrayal of Mexico and those who reside within it....

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1100 Words

Writers are over-examined and over-discussed. Not exactly an audacious thesis statement for the first number of a biweekly column about writers and writing, and yet, here we all are. Writers are under such close scrutiny thanks to writers—writers write about themselves, about one another, about their feelings, their goals, their ever-declining place in society. There...

Edgar Allan Poe for All
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Edgar Allan Poe for All

by Dahlia Adler January is the birth month of Edgar Allan Poe, and while he’s frequently thought of as “That Gothic author Americans were forced to read in school,” his range was far greater than people realize…and that’s to say nothing of what he’s inspired over 150 years after his death, and the clever, nuanced...

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Ted Bundy’s Success Is A Feminist Issue

by Renee Asher Pickup The Stranger Beside Me was a groundbreaking, heart-stopping work. Ann Rule’s first book deal, assigned to her months before she ever knew her own friend and colleague was the murderer she wrote about, would become the definitive true crime book, the definitive book on Ted Bundy, and the work that launched...