Author: Bronzeville Bee (Bronzeville Bee)

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Fiction: Elma Honey by Christa Hogan

by Christa Hogan MeMaw visits at nights mostly, when Daddy’s asleep and our little house in town is quiet. Tonight when she comes, I’m waiting for her, damp with sweat from the heat, my head full of Beulah Mae’s warnings about hell. I can tell the moment MeMaw arrives. Even her ghost smells like smoke...

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Hot Pink Gaze: In Defense of Fashion and the Feminine As Crucial Art and Cultural Actors

by Ivonne Spinoza “Proust knew how much the fleeting expression of fashion… can reflect something beyond its limited time, something that whispers of the nostalgia of human impermanence…”  Cecil Beaton, The Glass of Fashion Fashion has often been relegated to the sidelines of what is considered “serious culture” and worthy of “real cultural studies” because...

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Friday’s Forgotten Books – Review: America Is Not the Heart by Elaine Castillo

Review by Vanessa Rodriguez America Is Not the Heart by Filipino-American author Elaine Castillo debuted in 2018. Its title is a play on Carlos Bulosan’s semi-autobiographical novel, America Is In the Heart, published in 1946. Castillo’s narrative covers three generations of Filipina women from immigration under Marcos’ oppressive rule to living in the States clambering...

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Review: Crier’s War by Nina Varela

by Laila Winters Of all the books that were released in 2019, I was most excited for Nina Varela’s debut. Crier’s War is an LGBTQ+ novel that straddles the line between science fiction and fantasy, and it did not disappoint. It tells the story of Ayla, a human servant with the dire need to avenge...

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Fiction: The Gift by Dawn Vogel

By Dawn Vogel T’was the night before Christmas, and I wasn’t done with my shopping. There was only one person I wanted to buy a gift. I knew she’d understand if I didn’t give her anything, but I wanted to. I needed to see her eyes sparkle with delight. I worked until close, which meant...

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Why We Like the Mandalorian

By Jonathan E. Hernandez A cloaked figure walks towards a small establishment on the horizon. His past is a mystery, and yet this morally ambiguous man-with-no-name seems at once familiar. We can practically piece together his backstory as we watch in anticipation – and that’s long before the almost nostalgic score from composer Ludwig Göransson...